Great People Hanging Out Together

photographic records of unlikely or interesting meetings from history
Between the two great socialists, Albert Einstein and George Bernard Shaw, is seated the banker Lionel Rothschild, at the Savoy Hotel in London, 1930.

Between the two great socialists, Albert Einstein and George Bernard Shaw, is seated the banker Lionel Rothschild, at the Savoy Hotel in London, 1930.

E. M. Forster (right) and his Indian Muslim lover, Syed Ross Masood (left)

E. M. Forster (right) and his Indian Muslim lover, Syed Ross Masood (left)

Einstein, Prime Minister Nehru & Nehru’s sister, Vijaya Pandit at Princeton, November 5, 1949
Among other things, the Zionist Einstein and Third-Worldist icon Nehru are said to have had a heated discussion on the question of Palestine.

Einstein, Prime Minister Nehru & Nehru’s sister, Vijaya Pandit at Princeton, November 5, 1949

Among other things, the Zionist Einstein and Third-Worldist icon Nehru are said to have had a heated discussion on the question of Palestine.

Standing, far left, Hasan al-Banna, founder of the Muslim Brotherhood; third left, Liaquat Ali Khan, Pakistan’s first Prime Minister; seated, second left, their host Amin al-Husseini, the infamous Grand Mufti of Jerusalem; third left, guest of honour Quaid-e-Azam Jinnah, founder of Pakistan. Cairo, 1946.
As the curious nature of this photograph is a little less self-explanatory, a few words: here Pakistan’s two greatest leaders, Jinnah and Khan, represent a whisky-swilling, English-speaking, Oxbridge-educated Indo-Muslim elite, in an incongruous embrace with the 20th century’s two most influential Islamists, al-Banna and al-Husseini. This is a photo that perhaps epitomises the paradox of Pakistan and the schizophrenia that mired her from the start.

Standing, far left, Hasan al-Banna, founder of the Muslim Brotherhood; 
third left, Liaquat Ali Khan, Pakistan’s first Prime Minister;
seated, second left, their host Amin al-Husseini, the infamous Grand Mufti of Jerusalem;
third left, guest of honour Quaid-e-Azam Jinnah, founder of Pakistan.
Cairo, 1946.

As the curious nature of this photograph is a little less self-explanatory, a few words: here Pakistan’s two greatest leaders, Jinnah and Khan, represent a whisky-swilling, English-speaking, Oxbridge-educated Indo-Muslim elite, in an incongruous embrace with the 20th century’s two most influential Islamists, al-Banna and al-Husseini. This is a photo that perhaps epitomises the paradox of Pakistan and the schizophrenia that mired her from the start.